Events

ACJI hosts a variety of public lectures, seminars, events and executive and continuing education featuring experts from Australia and overseas.

Upcoming Events at Law Week 2019...


View our Law Week flyer here.

Digital Civics and Legal Capability in the Community: Expanding Access to Justice

Date: Thursday 16 May
Time: 5.45-7pm
Venue: Monash University Law Chambers Auditorium, 555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne
RSVP: Register here

Technology is increasingly recognised as an important means of enabling community members to participate in the design and delivery of services. At the same time, as the demand grows for technology-based solutions to legal problems, there are pressing questions about the relationship between community members' digital and legal capabilities. In this exciting event, two internationally-recognised experts will present cutting edge developments from the cross-disciplinary fields of digital civics and assisted digital services. This seminar will be of interest to anyone committed to understanding how technology can best be used to promote access to justice.

Speakers
Patrick Olivier

Patrick Olivier is Professor of Human-Computer Interaction at Monash University and his research spans the application of social and ubiquitous computing, the development of new approaches to interaction (including as novel sensing platforms and interaction techniques) and human-centred design methods. Patrick coined the term Digital Civics -- now a central focus of his research -- a cross-disciplinary area of research that explores ways technology can promote new forms of participation in the design and delivery of local services including education, public health and social care and town planning. Before joining Monash in December 2018, Patrick was Professor of Human-Computer Interaction in the School of Computing, Newcastle University, UK where founded and lead Open Lab, a centre for cross-disciplinary research in digital technologies, where he was director of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the EPSRC Digital Economy Research Centre.
Catrina Denvir

Dr Catrina Denvir is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Business Law and Taxation, Monash Business School, Monash University. She joined Monash from Ulster University where she Directed the Legal Innovation Centre - a joint initiative between the School of Law and the School of Computer Science and Intelligent Systems. The research Catrina conducts is inherently interdisciplinary and engages issues relevant to law, technology, legal services, legal education (public and professional), ethics, sociology, psychology (behaviour) and public policy. She has published widely on the subjects of: technological innovation in the legal profession; the role of law in everyday life; public understanding of the law; design of legal services; access to justice; industrial action, and; research methodology. She has a keen interest in applying methodologies from other fields, to the study of the law and has expertise in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative research methodologies.

Legal Tech and Design Masterclass

Get introduced to the NewLaw landscape and learn about how Human-Centred Design is being used to enhance justice.

The Legal Tech and Design Masterclass will be a hands-on workshop where the public can learn about human-centred design and the use of legal tech in the profession. Facilitated by Rachel Kessel, of Monash University and the Australian Centre for Justice Innovation, this is a window into what it is like to study NewLaw. Rachel, who was named Academic of the Year at the 2018 Lawyers Weekly, Women in Law Awards, is passionate about teaching and the intersection of law and technology. Come along to take a peek into the future of what digital lawyers might be doing by 2029.

Date: Friday 17 May
Time: 1.00-2:30pm
Venue: Monash University Law Chambers Auditorium, 555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne
RSVP: Register here

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Recent Events...


NATIONAL WELLNESS FOR LAW CONFERENCE: Making Wellness Core Business

Date: 14-15 February 2019
Presented by: Faculty of Law, Monash University and Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne
Sponsors: Australian Centre for Justice Innovation and the Health Law and Wellbeing Group

View the flyer here.

View the Twitter feed from Forum.

Day 1: Wellbeing in Legal Education: Melbourne Law School, 185 Pelham Street Carlton.

Day 1 Will include colleagues from medicine and health sciences to share experiences and learning on wellness and the tertiary learning experience and transition to professional life.

Day 2: Wellbeing in the Profession: Faculty of Law, Monash University, Monash University Law Chambers, 555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne

Day 2 will include keynote speakers and panels with members of the judiciary, practitioners and
researchers on wellbeing in the profession. Attendees at Day 2 may be eligible for 6 CPD units.


Mental Health Courts: What can we learn from the US experience?

Magistrate Felicity Zempilas from Western Australia's mental health court, the START Court, will speak about the findings from her recent Churchill Fellowship which saw her travel to the United States in 2018. She reflects on latest practice and policy developments in the United States mental health courts that will be relevant to those working in mental health courts and other problem-oriented courts, and those interested in therapeutic jurisprudence and responses to offenders with mental illness. Magistrate Zempilas' talk will be followed by a panel discussion of magistrates and other experts.

Date: Thursday 11 October
Time: 5.30pm - 7.30pm
Venue: Monash University Law Chambers, 555 Lonsdale Street, Auditorium
Event Flyer

About Magistrate Felicity Zempilas

Felicity Zempilas graduated with a Bachelor of Laws from the University of Western Australia in 1993. She was admitted as a practitioner of the Supreme Court of Western Australia in December 1994.

After completing articles, Felicity commenced as a lawyer in the criminal section of the Aboriginal Legal Service in Perth. She took up a position as a state prosecutor with the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions in 1996, during which time she also completed a year’s secondment to the Office of the State Coroner in 2000. Felicity later commenced permanently as Counsel Assisting the State Coroner in 2003 and worked part time in that position, assisting in a large number of inquests. During that time she had two children; Max (born 2002) and Poppy (born 2006).

Felicity was appointed as a Magistrate in August 2009 and worked in the Goldfields, Esperance and Western Desert Regions until early 2014, hearing matters involving criminal, civil, family and mining law and covering a broad geographical area. This included presiding in the Aboriginal Sentencing Community Court. She then worked as a Magistrate in Perth, focussing mainly on criminal, civil and mining law and, since the beginning of 2017, is now the dedicated Magistrate in the Adult Mental Health Diversion (Start) Court. She was awarded a Churchill Fellowship in 2017 to study mental health courts in the United States.


Rethinking drug policy in Victoria

With Associate Professor Kate Seear, Fiona Patten MLC, Mick Palmer AO APM, Magistrate Tony Parsons and Associate Professor Becky Batagol as MC. 

Monash Law’s Australian Centre for Justice Innovation and Law, Health & Wellbeing Group have partnered to host a panel discussion exploring the justice system implications of the Victorian Parliament's recent inquiry into drug law reform. This landmark inquiry recommends major reforms to Victoria's approach to alcohol and other drug use, with a strategy that focuses on prevention, harm reduction and improved health outcomes. It provides a roadmap towards implementing significant changes to the state's drug policy, and a move away from traditional criminal justice responses.

Our panel of experts will talk about some of the most significant recommendations in the report, reflect on their implications for health outcomes, social policy, policing and law enforcement. They will also consider how the suggested reforms sit against other recent developments in Victoria's drug policy, such as the development of the state's first supervised injecting facility and the expansion of specialist drug courts. The panellists will also analyse the potential of the inquiry's recommendations to improve social, economic and health outcomes for people who use alcohol and other drugs in Victoria.

Date: Monday 30 July 2018
Time: 5:30-7pm
Venue: Monash Law Chambers
555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne

Register here

About the speakers

Kate Seear

Associate Professor Kate Seear

Associate Professor Kate Seear is a lawyer, and academic in the Faculty of Law at Monash University. She is also the Academic Director of Springvale Monash Legal Service. She holds a prestigious Australian Research Council DECRA Fellowship. Through this research she explores how Australian and Canadian law understands alcohol and other drug ‘addiction’. She is the author of numerus books, articles and reports on alcohol and other drug policy and law, the relationship between drug law and public health, stigma and human rights.

Tony Parsons

Magistrate Tony Parsons

Tony Parsons is the Supervising Magistrate at Melbourne’s Drug Court and a member of the Premier’s Ice Action Task Force. After completing his LLB at the University of Melbourne in 1984, Tony became principal of Slades Barristers & Solicitors in 1987 and specialised in criminal law.  In 2000 Tony was appointed Managing Director of Victoria Legal Aid and in 2008 he was appointed as a Magistrate. For thirty-eight consecutive years and counting has been a member of the Melbourne Football Club.

Mick Palmer

Mick Palmer AO APM

Mick Palmer was a Director of Australia21 from 2012-2016 and also served as Deputy Chair during that time. He is a 33 year career police officer with extensive experience in police leadership and reform in community, national and international policing. He served as Commissioner of the Northern Territory Police, Fire and Emergency Service agency from 1988-1994 and as Commissioner of the Australian Federal Police (AFP) from 1994 until March 2001.



Fiona Patten MLC

Fiona Patten is the leader of the Reason Party, and Member of the Victorian Legislative Council for the Northern Metropolitan region. She came to politics after 20 years of lobbying for the rights of organisations involved in the sexual rights movement – including small businesses, sex workers, HIV/AIDS organisations, adult media and online anti-censorship groups. Since being elected in 2014, Fiona has campaigned for evidence-based policies including drug law reform, safe access to abortion clinics and voluntary assisted dying.

Becky Batagol
Event MC - Associate Professor Becky Batagol

Dr Becky Batagol is an Associate Professor of Law at Monash University. She is a researcher and teacher with a focus on family law, family violence, non-adversarial justice, dispute resolution, therapeutic jurisprudence, gender, child protection and constitutional law. Becky is the co-author of Non-Adversarial Justice (2nd ed, 2014).  Becky is a Deputy Director of the Australian Centre for Justice Innovation and co-convener of the faculty's Feminist Legal Studies Group.