Addressing the Silence: Men’s Health in Australia

Addressing the Silence: Men’s Health in Australia

Addressing the Silence: Men’s Health in Australia aims to understand, and then dismantle, the stigma associated with male mental health, gender norms and the seeking of medical assistance. Bringing together some of Monash University’s leading men’s health experts, this collection examines how lifestyle, as well as personal and societal expectation can negatively impact upon male health, and how these concerns can be effectively addressed with strategic policy. An ongoing collection, Addressing the Silence: Men’s Health in Australia, provides policymakers, thought-leaders and decision makers with a variety of informed perspectives, an examination of the current state of men’s health in Australia, and projections of, and recommendations for, the future.

According to the Australian Men’s Health Forum (AMHF), Australia is one of the world’s healthiest societies. Yet, the gender health gap reveals concerning trends when it comes to the health of men. On average, Australian men die six years younger than their female counterparts. 4 out of 5 heart disease deaths in Australia are male. 3 out of 4 suicide deaths, 3 out of 4 road deaths and 2 out of 3 violent deaths in Australia are male. Men under 75 are twice as likely as women to die from preventable causes.

Men in rural or remote areas are particularly vulnerable. The lack of access to proper support and medical care means men in these areas are at a higher risk of mental health concerns, have a higher rate of suicide, and are more affected by otherwise preventable illnesses. Gender norms and societal expectation also contribute to the gender health gap. The stigma that still surrounds mental health issues mean men are traditionally less likely to seek help. Instead, they often remain undiagnosed, and tend toward self-medication through substance abuse. Higher rates of alcohol consumption, particularly within social situations, puts men at risk both in the short and long term. Men are more likely to engage in high-risk and dangerous behaviour, and the prolonged effects of excessive alcohol consumption negatively impact physical health. This all places unsustainable pressure on an already stretched healthcare system and contributes to increased rates of gender and family violence. These emotional and economic consequences are far-reaching, but they’re not inevitable. With good policy and governance, men's health issues can be addressed and attitudes and outcomes can be changed for the better.

Policy Insights & Responses

.

Articles

Male fertility:
The biological clock ticks for men, too, and affects IVF success

Faculty Monash Health

Read More

Risky drinking among men:
alcohol's role in social interaction

Gender equality:
it's everyone's business

What to make of modern medicine's attention to men

School of Social Sciences, Faculty of  Arts
Read More
MSDI and the Faculty of Law
Read More 
Faculty of Arts
Read More 

When sex is at steak:
beefing up men's desire for meat

Department of Marketing, Faculty of Business & Economics

Read More

Returning from WW II was just the start of further battles on the home front

Faculty of Arts

Read More